Tuesday , August 16 2022

What does China Want From Africa? Everything



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Photographer: Waldo Swiegers / Bloomberg

and copying; 2018 Finance LP Funding

China wants everything from Africa: its strategic location, its oil, its rare earth metals, and its fish, leaving the debt of African countries to Beijing.

In its long history, Africa has served the global ambitions of many foreigners. Foreigners have arrived in Africa to become ambassadors, financiers and infrastructure builders. They have pledged to place the continent on the globalization map and help its people grow out of poverty. But in the end they scraped the wealth of Africa, colonizing one nation after another, and letting their people suffer poverty.

That might happen again, t & nbsp;with recent China infrastructure investment projects in the continent.

On the face of it, these projects seem to serve the African countries campaign to build a solid infrastructure. But looking in more detail, they serve China's ambitions to write the next stage rules of globalization.

China wants to use Africa as a location to secure marine roads (and the OBOR projects) which facilitate Chinese exports, as demonstrated by Beijing's major military presence in Djibouti.

Then there are African resources, oil, rare soil metals, and fish.

“As South Africa, I've seen China's activities on the continent close,” said Ted Bauman, & nbsp; Senior Research Analyst at Banyan Hill Publishing. “It is clear that China's main goal with foreign investment is geopolitical, not economic. The most consequential investments are made by companies owned by the state, not by Chinese private capital. They tend to focus on infrastructure such as highways, ports and dams, and on public networks such as the electrical grid. ”

That is something that many African countries are desperate for need in their application to develop their economies.

The trouble is that “these investments help to bind countries to China politically, and through debt obligations,” explains Bauman. “We create a kind of influence that China can use to force these countries to support Chinese ambitions globally. In some cases, such as the Angolan oil sector or mining for the Congo's rare soil, a Chinese investment helps to lock supply connections with essential goods. ”

Meanwhile, Chinese boats arrive in West Africa, sweeping the sea from any fish trying to swim through the spreading nets.

Xiaomeng Lu, China's practice leader is & nbsp; Access Partnership, a global public policy consultancy for the technology sector, raises a more fundamental problem with Chinese investments. “China's investments are presented in a slightly awkward, if not controversial way,” he said. “For example, the Huawei Smart City project in Port Colombo City, Sri Lanka, is facing criticism for being too ambitious and full of debt.” Not to mention the port of Hambantota, which has been put in Chinese hands for the next century, o due to Beijing debt trap.

“Xi's Chinese President aims to realize the“ great nation; renovation; nbsp; the nation; & nbsp; Chinese nation & nbsp; ”By projecting power abroad through the“ Belt and Road ”initiative, covering South East Asia and Africa,” added Lu. “This political economy effort is being prepared with the growing military potential of China in the South China Sea and the African continent, presenting an increasing challenge to the U-security umbrella across the world.” T

Then there is the high risk tolerance of the Chinese business model, which is more favorable to the developing world, according to Lu. “The high risk tolerance of Chinese companies, a low margin margin business model succeeds well in the developing world,” explains Lu. “The interest of China's commercial sector overlaps with its government's initiative in these geographies. For example, Huawei operates on a very thin profit profit and is an industry leader in many markets that come to the fore where western competitors such as Nokia and Ericson have failed to make a profit. ”

“China's behavior is essentially the same as US behavior in the second half of the 20th& nbsp; century, ”explains Bauman. “It's using his growing economic power to build political" soft power. " And with the United States basically blame in terms of international relations, the chances that China will succeed very well indeed. ”

But on its own terms, rather than the terms of African countries.

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Photographer: Waldo Swiegers / Bloomberg

© 2018 LP Finance LP

China wants everything from Africa: its strategic location, its oil, its rare earth metals, and its fish, leaving the debt of African countries to Beijing.

In its long history, Africa has served the global ambitions of many foreigners. Foreigners have arrived in Africa to become ambassadors, financiers and infrastructure builders. They have pledged to place the continent on the globalization map and help its people grow out of poverty. But in the end they scraped the wealth of Africa, colonizing one nation after another, and letting their people suffer poverty.

That might happen again, t with recent China infrastructure investment projects in the continent.

On the face of it, these projects seem to serve the African countries campaign to build a solid infrastructure. But looking in more detail, they serve China's ambitions to write the next stage rules of globalization.

China wants to use Africa as a location to secure marine roads (and the OBOR projects) which facilitate Chinese exports, as demonstrated by Beijing's major military presence in Djibouti.

Then there are African resources, oil, rare soil metals, and fish.

“As South Africa, I've seen China's activities on the continent close,” said Ted Bauman, Senior Research Analyst at Banyan Hill Publishing. “It is clear that China's main goal with foreign investment is geopolitical, not economic. The most consequential investments are made by companies owned by the state, not by Chinese private capital. They tend to focus on infrastructure such as highways, ports and dams, and on public networks such as the electrical grid. ”

That is something that many African countries really need in their bid to develop their economies.

The trouble is that “these investments help to bind countries to China politically, and through debt obligations,” explains Bauman. “We create a kind of influence that China can use to force these countries to support Chinese ambitions globally. In some cases, such as the Angolan oil sector or mining for the Congo's rare soil, a Chinese investment helps to lock supply connections with essential goods. ”

Meanwhile, Chinese boats arrive in West Africa, sweeping the sea from any fish trying to swim through the spreading nets.

Xiaomeng Lu, China's practice leader in Access Partnership, a global public policy consultancy for the technology sector, raises a more fundamental problem with Chinese investments. “China's investments are presented in a slightly awkward, if not controversial way,” he said. “For example, the Huawei Smart City project in Port Colombo City, Sri Lanka, is facing criticism for being too ambitious and full of debt.” Not to mention the port of Hambantota, which has been put in Chinese hands for the next century, o due to Beijing debt trap.

“The Chinese President of Xi aims to realize the“ great revival of the Chinese nation ”by predicting power abroad through the“ Belt and Road ”initiative, which covers Southeast Asia and Africa,” adds Lu. “This political economy effort is being prepared with the growing military potential of China in the South China Sea and the African continent, presenting an increasing challenge to the U-security umbrella across the world.” T

Then there is the high risk tolerance of the Chinese business model, which is more favorable to the developing world, according to Lu. “The high risk tolerance of Chinese companies, a low margin margin business model succeeds well in the developing world,” explains Lu. “The interest of China's commercial sector overlaps with its government's initiative in these geographies. For example, Huawei operates on a very thin profit profit and is an industry leader in many markets that come to the fore where western competitors such as Nokia and Ericson have failed to make a profit. ”

“China's behavior is essentially the same as US behavior in the second half of the 20th century, ”explains Bauman. “He is using his growing economic power to build political“ soft power ”. And with the United States basically blame in terms of international relations, the chances that China will succeed very well indeed. ”

But on its own terms, rather than the terms of African countries.

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