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NH who is suspected of having measles does not have a disease, officials say



A child from New Hampshire who is suspected of suffering from measles has no disease, health officials said on Thursday. The Department of Health and Human Services announced last week to people in the Keene area after the child developed symptoms that appear to be measles. But officials said further tests showed that the child was likely to show the symptoms of a vaccination reaction >> DHHS Information: Measles (.pdf) "Measles is very infectious, so the laboratory information is t This new shows that the child 's symptoms are not from the infectious measles is good news, "said Dr Benjamin Chan, who identified an epidemiologist. "However, this situation reminds us that, as measles circulate at unprecedented levels nationally, we all need to ensure that we and our family members are protected. 39 vaccination against measles. there was no infectious vaccine known to circulate in the community. Officials reported that specialist laboratory tests had been carried out after being told that the child had been vaccinated days before being diagnosed with measles. The tests determined that the child suffered the symptoms of a vaccine reaction, rather than the vaccination. Officials said that about 5 percent of people receiving measles, headaches and rubella, or MMR, will develop a fever and rash reaction as the body accumulates antibodies to & # 39 measles. More severe reactions are similar to that of a real measles virus infection, as seen in the child, very few officers said. The MMR vaccine is made using a weak virus. There were no confirmed cases in the scientific literature of transmitting the measles vaccine to the person-to-human. A virus is caused by a virus that is passed from person to person by air when someone with the disease is sneezing, coughing or conversations. The virus can remain infectious in the air for up to two hours after an infected person leaves the area. Individuals who have not received a measles vaccine are very easily contracted by someone else. The incubation period for measles from the time of exposure is seven to 21 days. Symptoms of measles infection usually start with a high fever, cough, runny nose and conjunctivitis several days before developing a rash.

A New Hampshire child suspected of suffering from measles has no disease, health officials said on Thursday.

The Department of Health and Human Services announced a warning last week to people in the Keene area after the child developed symptoms that appear to be measles. But officials said that further tests showed that the child was likely to show the symptoms of a vaccine reaction.

>> DHHS Information: Measles (.pdf) t

"The measles are very infectious, so this new laboratory knowledge shows that the child 's symptoms are not from the infectious measles in good news," he said. T "said Dr. Benjamin Chan, an epidemiologist state. "However, this situation reminds us that, as measles circulate at unprecedented levels nationally, we all need to ensure that we and our family members are protected. 39 vaccination against measles.

Health officials said infectious measles did not know that it was circulating in the community with the new diagnosis.

Officials reported that specialist laboratory tests had been carried out after being taught that the child had been vaccinated days before being diagnosed with measles. The tests decided that the child was suffering from the symptoms of a vaccine reaction, rather than measles.

Officials said around 5 per cent of people receiving measles, headaches and rubella, or MMR, will develop fever and a rash reaction as the body builds antibodies to & # 39 measles. More serious reactions that are similar to the real measles virus infection, as seen in the child, are very rare, officials said.

The MMR vaccine is made using a weak virus. There were no confirmed cases in the scientific literature of transmitting measles to humans.

Measles is caused by a virus passed from person to person by air when someone with the disease is sneezing, coughing or conversations. The virus can remain infectious in the air for up to two hours after an infected person leaves the area.

Individuals who have not received a measles vaccine are very easily contracted by someone else. The incubation period for measles from the time of exposure is seven to 21 days. Symptoms of measles infection usually start with a high fever, cough, runny nose and conjunctivitis several days before developing a rash.

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