Tuesday , May 17 2022

If Pelosi Returns as Spokesman, So The Playbook Will Be GOP In It All: NPR



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Nancy Pelosi, Minority Leader of House, D-Calif., Reaches a news conference earlier this month as some unfortunate Democrats promise to oppose his upcoming speakers in the 116th Congress.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP


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J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Nancy Pelosi, Minority Leader of House, D-Calif., Reaches a news conference earlier this month as some unfortunate Democrats promise to oppose his upcoming speakers in the 116th Congress.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

For almost a decade, Nancy Pelosi was a non-secretary GOP tool.

Republican currency spokeswoman joined a congressional candidate to the Democratic leader and litter rubbish another speaker for many of the last decade.

But in 2018, that strategy failed – badly. The Democrats moved control of the House and are on track to raise as much as 40 seats with their most popular polling border since the Watergate scandal, and Pelosi hopes to become the House Speaker again as his co- Democrats take a first vote on Wednesday.

In part, Republicans say that Democrats successfully endeavored to succeed Pelosi in 2018 to convince voters of their independence. But many of them come to vote for a speaker again, do not count on the Pelosi strategy among the GOP to take away any time soon.

"I still think she's a toxic figure and an unpopular figure to definitely wear Democrats," said Andrea Bozek, former communications communications director at the National Republican Congressional Committee. "That's why you had a lot of Democrats and candidates during the campaign saying they would not vote for it, which is somewhat unexpected."

Pelosi has once again shown her political proficiency to even suspicious legislators and reaching new women to her. A formal Speaker vote will not be held until January, but enough enough orders have now suggested that it looks like the California Democrats will claim the goal again.

Joint support

On Tuesday, a group of 20 new people – including those who were enthusiastic about her on the campaign route – had released a letter explaining their logic for supporting the 78-year-old Pelosi now.

"The first class of first term members is younger and more diverse than ever before. A proven leader as a Pelosi Leader will be a valuable resource as we, ourselves, move on to lead, and at we work to make life better for the people we represent, "the letter reads.

One of those signatories, the electoral representative of Angie Craig of Minnesota, admitted that he was campaigning saying he would consider new leadership, but said on Tuesday during a panel discussion on bipartisanism that "you can not beat something without no "and that she supported Pelosi after meeting her and talking about acting on several issues that he emphasized during his campaign.

Possible Pelosi fans also support. Ohio's representative Marcia Fudge was an alternative, but announced last week that he would support Pelosi after pressing concessions from the leader and having a role in leading a regeneration panel on electoral administration. New York Representative, Brian Higgins, who had previously signed an anti-Pelosi letter, also reversed a course.

According to a list from NBC News, there were at least 58 sizes or candidates during the circle who said they would not either support Pelosi or indicate that they are open to new leadership, much more than # 39 ; the number it would need to stop its path if they all opposed it.

Representative-elect Lauren Underwood from Illinois was one of those on the fence. But she also said on Tuesday that she realized that the people in Washington focused on Pelosi but said fairly "people at home do not worry".

Underwood said he was asking correspondents to ask regularly during the Pelosi campaign but he argued that "we are losing so much" of the other issues that voters look after with the intense focus on the leadership race Democratic

Still a lightning rod?

Democratic strategies say their winning strategy in 2018 proves that Pelosi is not the motivating factor for that reason, again, with its more emphasis on things like healthcare and the rights that I & It shows that voters want answers and not just rhetoric about who will be in leadership.

"This is an old, tired playbook, they've been proven since dating back to 2006," said Democrat adviser and producer John Lapp. "The Republicans ran it in areas across the country, and it really fell in some ways, and in some ways we will say it's back."

Republicans have always strived to use the San Francisco lawmaker as the embodiment of the ideals that Republicans knew in anathema to many central America – a liberal coastal elite that they could paint as they would want to raise taxes and zoom & deficit

Some Democrats argue that the way Republican attempts to use Pelosi as a political weapon this year is particularly a deaf tone, as white women in suburban areas resist the GOP.

"There's a huge element of sexism here. As a rule [Pelosi] looks like it scratches or gets angry and has a fierce face in all of these ads. There is something symbolic of the power of women in the workplace and the leadership of women, but for some voters who are threatening, "said Democratic policemen Anna Greenberg." Suburban, professional, educational women are very supportive of women in leadership, and Pelosi is very popular among them. "

There were even signs before the Election Day cracks were a GOP strategy. A republican internal survey received by Bloomberg News in September showed that voters were more likely to support the candidate who had aligned Pelosi than once approved by President Trump by five points.

Republican groups still held advertisements using Pelosi in some of the races that Greenberg worked on this area, including the Lizzie Pannill Fletcher Democrat victory over the Texas GOP Representative John Culberson.

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Greenberg said he never saw the numbers moving a lot after such an attack. However, other Republicans privately say that, if they did not try to use Pelosi again in some races and make it a national ticket, they could have lost even more seats.

Fletcher was another fierce man who came to an eye who said during the campaign that she would not necessarily support Pelosi as a speaker. But she and others have come around saying they will go back to California curator about the situation – even for Republicans giving Pelosi credit as evidence of political skills and enthusiasm.

Other Republicans admit that the reason for Pelosi was that bogeyman did not work this year was simple – the Democrats had more than one time.

"It's about to start and end with Trump," said Doug Heye, the GOP strategist. "Pelosi is provoking Republican base voters, but obviously the Democrats had much more among them that they were motivated than Republicans."

Heye was the director of communications at the National Republic of Wales in 2010 when the Affordable Care Act passed while Pelosi Speaker was leading the majority of Democratic House, and helped to lead their "Fire Pelosi" initiative ultimately successful in the mid-term elections of that year as Republicans were motivated into force. But as Heye explained last week in the Daily Beast op-ed, there was a clear reason why the Republicans focused therefore on getting rid of Pelosi.

"Nancy Pelosi, who we thought was, had to go exactly because it was so effective. If Pelosi's Speaker could not get Obamacare, our campaign did not have any logic," said Heye.

Freshmen such as Fletcher and Underwood who remained uncommon to vote for Pelosi, or those who were waiting to resist her, had embedded some political assaults. Republicans say there was a special election in March around Pittsburgh, where Democrat Conor Lamb was able to turn a seat held by GOP, and the moderate Democrats gave a playbook for his abolition from his party leader others could repeat it.

And at a white level, the Pelosi strategy might work. Republicans believe he will help rescue another special election last year in 6th Class Georgia. But when things become macro, it's harder to stop the bleeding. After all, the same area fell in the suburbs of Atlanta to Democratic hands in mid Wales.

Even with lower results than salaries this year by doubling Pelosi, not all Republicans are willing to give that strategy up in the future. And with new people in swing seats reversing a course and supporting Pelosi, Republicans are eager to have the pieces of them cast their voice vote for a Speaker in January that they can use against them.

Democrats opposing Pelosi also argue that he gives these new members a difficult place on their first vote in Congress.

Some in the GOP point out that, with Democrats partly managing one branch of government, that the Pelosi Speaker could actually help Trump, with him easy to make it a small burn in the way voters could believe it easier now by the Democrats some power back.

And if it can build it to even more drag, do not be surprised if Republicans regenerate their Pelosi strategy again in 2020.

NPR Deirdre Walsh's congressional editor.

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