Thursday , August 18 2022

Ask Amy: To protect the herd, a nurse encourages everyone's immunity



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Dear Readers: I have stepped away from the Ask Amy column for two weeks to work on a new writing project. I hope you enjoy the "best" columns in this absence. All of these questions and answers were first published 10 years ago. Topic today: wellbeing.

Dear Amy: As a public health nurse and a mother of four, I spend a lot of time talking about germs and staying healthy. With seasonal flu, H1N1 and casual germs such as MRSA in the community, I'm surprised that people bring their newborn to the shop or grocery store and that they pass around as postcards. For the mother who wrote you, if she kept her young home, stranger who could not touch her baby would be a problem.

Children under 6 months of age do not work fully or fully. They should not be out in crowds, such as the center or the parties. People with domestic infants (or babies' carers) should have their flu photos. By ensuring that everyone who is in contact with the baby is immunized, they protect the baby that they can not get the shot. This is known as "herd immunity." If you love them, immunize. If they are too young to become immunized, protect them by keeping them away from public places.

Nurse in California

Nurse in California: According to the Control Centers and Disease Prevention, around 36,000 Americans die each year of flu-related cases. Some parents who work do not have any choice but to bring their babies out to the world. Because of this, the wider community should do everything possible to help protect it. Thank you for your advocacy.

Dear Amy: How should I treat a bipolar friend? She's really fine until she gets to medicine, then she gets stuck and appalling, and I'm not sure how to forgive her what she has done tell me.

Ruthin Friend

Release Friend: Bipolar disorder is a serious illness that can respond well to treatment. The behavior and behavior swings that people with bipolar disorder experience can block. Your friend is responsible for maintaining her health and taking her medication to control her illness, and it is your responsibility to understand her health problems and to inform her when she is acting in a way that # 39; n harmed your friendship. When your friend is taking media and to abuse you, you should remind him of how his behavior affects you. Discuss this with her when it is stable. Ask her to pay closer attention to her treatment and offer to help. Your friend's illness can explain his behavior, but his burden acknowledges and apologizes. The National Institute of Mental Health offers a comprehensive description of this illness. Check nimh.nih.gov.

Dear Amy: I'm a nurse and work for a doctor for 34 years. He gave me generous redundancy. Bringing my son most of it because it adds to drugs. It is now resettlement and it's OK so far.

My husband then moved out of 27 years because he felt that "he was not good at the marriage." It has been far from me since its own retirement (five years ago).

My daughter lives two states away. We have hard time talking to each other. She is close to her father.

I feel as if I had been a good mother and wife. I do not know what went out of place. I have a group of friends I enjoy, but the loss of my family is being treated.

Any advice on how to go through this?

Mom Sad

Sad Mom: Apart from providing the words for western country ballads, these challenging times offer us opportunities to grow and change. It's hard to see it like this when you've been a test, but in life, we either adjust or stay in our sadness.

You could start by doing some soul-search, to see what you should take responsibility for and what you should leave. Give the first start we deserve.

Let your healthy relatives maintain and help you. Look for opportunities to work or volunteer, helping others. Many organizations would welcome your nursing skills. Being useful to others will help you to feel better about you and yourself.

Dear Readers: Are you curious about my background and life outside the space and space? Read my record two: "Mighty Queens of Freeville" and "Strangers Tend to Tell Me Things" available whenever books are sold or lent.

© 2019 by Amy Dickinson issued by Tribune Content Agency

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