Saturday , July 2 2022

A troubled Somali war offender ordered a Uber and Lyft ordered to pay $ 500,000 torture



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Farhan Mohamoud Tani Warfaa claimed in the court papers that he was beaten and tortured by soldiers ordered by Yusuf Abdi Ali – the man appeared in CNN's report.

According to Warfaa, Ali's soldiers beat him, took his clothes and used a kind of torture from the name "Mig," where they tied his hands and his feet behind to his back in a painful situation which was similar to the shape of the Somali Air Force's MIG plane. Ali was present during some of the torture, according to the legal case filed in the federal court in Virginia.

Warfaa said that Ali, also known as “Colonel Tukeh,” had been shot several times at a point point. The jury refused an allegation that Ali had tried to kill Warfaa unreasonably.

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In a statement after the ruling, Warfaa said, "It has been a long journey seeking justice for what happened to me and to my community. Today's judgment was justification for me, but also for many Other people in Somaliland suffered under the Tukeh Col Orders. "

Ali's attorney, Joseph Peter Drennan, told CNN that he and his client were disappointed in the outcome of the case, which, in their opinion, was a political incentive to benefit Somaliland, a region that was a t replace Somalia.

"Yusuf Abdi Ali was liable because he was commander in an army that served under a regime that had a poor human rights record. But apart from the evidence of the plaintiff, there was almost no evidence that Ali had tortured anyone," said Drennan.

Drennan said that Ali cannot afford to pay the compensation, stating that he has recently lost his job as a rideshare driver.

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Ali was not convicted of an offense in connection with his alleged behavior in Somalia.

But an internet search of her name seems to be published news accounts over the last three decades that included claims that she had committed various atrocities while serving as a military commander during Somalia's civil war in the 1980s.

CNN recently noted that Ali was a share driver with Uber and Lyft earlier this month. After CNN's investigations, Lyft permanently banned him from his platform and Uber stopped him pending a review of the issue.

When asked for an update after the jury's verdict on Tuesday, Uber said Ali's access to the app was to be permanently moved.

Uber's app previously listed Ali as a "Uber Pro Diamond" driver with a score of 4.89. When CNN reporters rushed with Ali covered and asked about Uber's background checking process, he replied that it was quick and easy.

"They want your background check, that's it," says Ali. "If you're applying tonight maybe after two days it comes, you know, everything."

CNN said that Uber and Lyft had approved thousands of drivers who should have been disqualified due to criminal records.

Uber and Lyft background checks are mainly made by a separate company from the name Checkr, which uses candidates' names and Social Security numbers to search for information in a national sex offender database, federal court records and local and used databases to flag suspicious terrorists and others, representatives of the companies said.

A Checkr spokesman told CNN that its background checks "rely on public criminal records awarded in a court of law rather than unverified sources such as Google search results. Similarly, most employers requires background checks involving civil litigation due due to its subjective nature. "

Uber strengthened its background checking policy last year and now includes more frequent checks. There are disqualified convicted drivers and drivers who have not been convicted but are charged with serious offenses. All drivers must "have a driving background check and criminal history review of local, state and national records, and we evaluate competence according to the criteria set by local laws," Uber said in a statement to CNN.

A spokesman for Lyft told CNN of the front, "The safety of our community is our top priority and we have been scared by the claims described. Before putting a ride on the Lyft platform, all driver-applicants are screened." about crime and driving incidents in the United States.

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