Thursday , May 26 2022

A large study of black men with prostate cancer to look beyond genetics



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Researchers at the US School of Keck of Medicine lead an effort of $ 26.5 million to conduct the first first rate study of black men with prostate cancer.

"African men are not only twice as likely to develop prostate cancer, but they are more likely to have an aggressive, more fatal form of the disease, and we do not know why," Christopher Haiman, ScD, says a preventative medicine teacher at Keck School of Medicine, in a press release. "There's a health difference that needs to be tackled. A lot of money, time and effort have gone into studies among men of European origins, it's time to endeavor on a large scale to be devoted to men of African assault. "

The collaborative effort – funded by NCI, the National Institute for Minorities of Health and Differentiations, and the Prostate Cancer Foundation – will include researchers from a number of other organizations and entities: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Jersey State Cancer Registry, New Jersey Department of Health, Public Health Organization, Emory University, Johns Hopkins University, LSU Health New Orleans, Baylor College of Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Foundation / Wayne State University and San Francisco University.

HemOnc Today talk to Haiman about the rationale for the study, how the research takes place, what he and his colleagues are hoping to learn, and the potential implications of their findings.

Question: Can you describe the logic for this study?

Answer: The rationale is to have an insight into the genetic nature of aggressive prostate cancer – specifically how genetic variations interact with social and environmental factors that can contribute to prostate cancer. Long-term differences in cases of disease, as well as disease and aggressive deaths, have been among African men's men compared to other populations. Strong evidence suggests that there is a genetic basis for some of the differences, based on some of the work we have done in the African African Prostate Cancer Consortium. We are now going beyond genetics.

Q: How will the study take place?

A: We intend to recruit 10,000 black men who have recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer. They will be recruited mainly through cancer registries in California, Detroit, New Jersey, Georgia, Texas, Louisiana and Florida. The men are asked to respond to a survey, provide a saliva sample, and give researchers permission to access their prostate or tissue and tumor cancer biopsy. The samples will be used to identify genetic marks for prostate cancer and tumor characteristics, with particular emphasis on aggressive prostate cancer.

Q: What is the time line for results?

A: This is a 5 year study. However, we hope to follow these men ahead of 5 years after studying to study other appointments, including re-occurrence and deaths.

Q: What do you and your colleagues hope to learn from the study?

A: We try to understand racial and ethnic inconsistencies and find out how social stress and genetic factors work together to influence the risk of aggressive disease. We hope that the information we collect from this study and future studies will help us identify strategies to prevent prostate cancer and improve outcomes for prostate cancer.

Q: Is there anything else you would like to mention?

A: The registration of 10,000 black men with prostate cancer will be a significant challenge. We want to encourage black men to take part, as we will only be able to make progress in understanding the factors that contribute to the disease in this population through their participation in this study. Recruitment for the study will start in 2019. For more information about the study and how to get involved, go to www.respondstudy.org. – – by Jennifer Southall

For more information:

Christopher Haiman, ScD, It can be reached at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, 1975 Zonal Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90033; e-mail: [email protected]

Disclosure: Haiman does not report any relevant financial disclosures.

Researchers at the US School of Keck of Medicine lead an effort of $ 26.5 million to conduct the first first rate study of black men with prostate cancer.

"African men are not only twice as likely to develop prostate cancer, but they are more likely to have an aggressive, more fatal form of the disease, and we do not know why," Christopher Haiman, ScD, says a preventative medicine teacher at Keck School of Medicine, in a press release. "There's a health difference that needs to be tackled. A lot of money, time and effort have gone into studies among men of European origins, it's time to endeavor on a large scale to be devoted to men of African assault. "

The collaborative effort – funded by NCI, the National Institute for Minorities of Health and Differentiations, and the Prostate Cancer Foundation – will include researchers from a number of other organizations and entities: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Jersey State Cancer Registry, New Jersey Department of Health, Public Health Organization, Emory University, Johns Hopkins University, LSU Health New Orleans, Baylor College of Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Foundation / Wayne State University and San Francisco University.

HemOnc Today talk to Haiman about the rationale for the study, how the research takes place, what he and his colleagues are hoping to learn, and the potential implications of their findings.

Question: Can you describe the logic for this study?

Answer: The rationale is to have an insight into the genetic nature of aggressive prostate cancer – specifically how genetic variations interact with social and environmental factors that can contribute to prostate cancer. Long-term differences in cases of disease, as well as disease and aggressive deaths, have been among African men's men compared to other populations. Strong evidence suggests that there is a genetic basis for some of the differences, based on some of the work we have done in the African African Prostate Cancer Consortium. We are now going beyond genetics.

Q: How will the study take place?

A: We intend to recruit 10,000 black men who have recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer. They will be recruited mainly through cancer registries in California, Detroit, New Jersey, Georgia, Texas, Louisiana and Florida. The men are asked to respond to a survey, provide a saliva sample, and give researchers permission to access their prostate or tissue and tumor cancer biopsy. The samples will be used to identify genetic marks for prostate cancer and tumor characteristics, with particular emphasis on aggressive prostate cancer.

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Q: What is the time line for results?

A: This is a 5 year study. However, we hope to follow these men ahead of 5 years after studying to study other appointments, including re-occurrence and deaths.

Q: What do you and your colleagues hope to learn from the study?

A: We try to understand racial and ethnic inconsistencies and find out how social stress and genetic factors work together to influence the risk of aggressive disease. We hope that the information we collect from this study and future studies will help us identify strategies to prevent prostate cancer and improve outcomes for prostate cancer.

Q: Is there anything else you would like to mention?

A: The registration of 10,000 black men with prostate cancer will be a significant challenge. We want to encourage black men to take part, as we will only be able to make progress in understanding the factors that contribute to the disease in this population through their participation in this study. Recruitment for the study will start in 2019. For more information about the study and how to get involved, go to www.respondstudy.org. – – by Jennifer Southall

For more information:

Christopher Haiman, ScD, It can be reached at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, 1975 Zonal Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90033; e-mail: [email protected]

Disclosure: Haiman does not report any relevant financial disclosures.

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