Thursday , August 11 2022

Unexpected results for babies: Twins seem to have better brain genes



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The Genscher at work: Cas9 protein is injected into the Petri plastic in embryo.

AP

The birth of the first genetically-born people triggers horror around the world. US researchers are convinced that treatment results in China are becoming much more than well-known initially. There is a likelihood of affecting the baby's brain.

According to a report, first-known babies with a known genome may have, in addition to their intended immunity to HIV AIDS virus, may also have changes to the brain. The twins, known as Lulu and Nana, were born last November in China. The scientist He Jiankui had changed his genome with the Crispr / Cas9 method, known as "genius scissors". Amongst other things, he has been heavily criticized around the world, due to potentially unforeseen potential side effects of genetically modified.

He had removed CCR5 of babies. As scientists now in the US "Cell" trade journal report, his / her treatment should have changed Lulu and Nana's brain. As a result, a clinical study of stroke patients shows that the brain of people who, naturally, is scarce of the gene, or whose function is blocked with drugs, improves faster. Students without CCR5 are also statistically more successful than others.

According to the MIT Technology Review, mice experiments also affect information as the gene is missing. The same is that the genetic brain also affects Lulu and Nana's brain, the journal cites the neuroscientist Alcino Silva from the University of California in Los Angeles. However, the exact effect of the gen adjustment on children is "impossible to predict, and that is precisely why it should not be done.

According to the "MIT Technology Review," the research raises new questions about its motivation for its unanimous unanimous way around the world. Preventing drug CCR5 is a common treatment to prevent AIDS from going to HIV patients. According to his own statements, he was trying to make Nana and Lulu, whose father appears to be HIV-positive, immune to the AIDS virus. However, Silva and other famous scientists in the field suspect that he has been at least aware of initial research on the positive effects of genetic adaptation of the brain.

To date, its statements about its approach and its effects on Nana and Lulu have not been checked independently by other scientists. Probably, another woman with a genetically modified baby is currently pregnant.

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