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Can the brain-promote MIND diet reduce the risk of dementia? | Life



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Following a MIND diet, which encourages enough foods in the brain, such as berries, it could help reduce the risk of dementia by new research. - AFP pic
Following a MIND diet, which encourages enough foods in the brain, such as berries, it could help reduce the risk of dementia by new research. – AFP pic

SYDNEY, March 11 – Australia's new research has found that the Most-DASH intervention for Neuroscenerational Delay, commonly known as an MIND diet, seems to reduce the risk of impairment cognitive in older adults.

It was conducted by researchers at the National University of Australia, the University of New South Wales, and the Australian Neuroscience Research. The new study looked at 1,220 adults aged 60 and over to assess the impact of the MIND diet, specifically designed to promote the health of the brain, and the traditional Mediterranean diet, at the opportunity to develop cognitive impairment and disorders such as Alzheimer's and dementia disease.

Participants were asked for their dietary habits using a food frequency questionnaire at the beginning of the study and a score was given to show how close they followed the MIND diet or the Mediterranean.

The Mediterranean diet, rich in fish, fruits, nuts, vegetables, beans, and olive oil and fewer meat, milk and process foods, is already linked in a number of studies to a range of health benefits from Include lower risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease and longer life.

The MIND diet has a partial split on a Mediterranean diet, but it contains foods that are related to the brain's health. There are 15 components that follow, with ten followers of coaches to eat green leaf vegetables and vegetables, berries, whole grains, nuts, beans, fish, poultry, olive oil, as well as enjoy small red wine, and five which advises the restriction of butter and margarine, cheese, red meat, fried food, and cakes and parasis.

The participants were then followed for a 12 year period, and researchers assessed their cognitive abilities and any cognitive impairments.

The perceptions, published last week in the magazine Alzheimer's Dementia, following that the MIND diet was associated with a decreased risk of 19 per cent of the development of a clinical cognitive impairment or dementia that was diagnosed.

Perhaps surprisingly, no benefit was found to adhere to the Mediterranean diet.

"This study has shown for the first time, outside the US, that the MIND diet reduces the risk of dementia," said lead author, the Professor Kaarin Anstey.

Professor Anstey added that further research is needed now, but hopefully a perception will help develop recommendations for reducing the risk of dementia. – AFP-Relaxnews

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