Sunday , July 25 2021

Hinemoa Elder: Our lessons in strong mokopuna leadership



I was inspired by the real leadership of some of the young people in Hoani Waiti Marae, writing Dr Hinemoa Elder.

DAVID WHITE / STUFF

I was inspired by the real leadership of some of the young people in Hoani Waiti Marae, writing Dr Hinemoa Elder.

VIEWS: Rangatira mō âpōpō, leaders of the future, is whakataukī used to describe young people. I often heard in the modified form and noted that they are today's leaders, ināianei.

I was inspired by the real leadership of some young people on Monday. As part of the Brain Research NZ, we were in the presence of students from Te Kura Kaupapa Māori from Hoani. Let me take you there.

I stand in the tomokanga, the entrance, from Hoani Waititi marae. Wait for the karanga that will take us forward, and I will, along with one of my dear respect, Dr Waiora Port, respond to him. This is our third year of annual kanganga with Kura total join.

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Standing there, I'll be very aware of all the stories and all the people that have led me to this detailed moment. Have you ever had one of those moments where did you feel that all the strands of your life come together? Here's one of them.

What follows is an exchanging, a pouquet, a ritual of contact.

I'm there as a type of accompaniment between our ethnic cultures, our generations of cultures. I know that this is the first marathon for some neurosciences. Some have told me they feel distressed and scared of causing a crime. And slowly over time, over every tongue, they grow secretly. Use their pepeha. Relax and tune into Whakaaro Māori, Māori think.

We are working hard to build a real relationship between our Māori community partners at Brain Research NZ. We currently have two, one with this. The other is with a piece of Puketeraki Marae in Karitane.

One of the key difficulties with the current health research funding model is that when the research reserves end it is the end of the relationship with interested parties or stakeholders, in most cases.

Therefore, we do not rely on so much research project funding to support these relationships. We commit to a long-term relationship with the community partners of Māori because that is our priority. And that's the expectation of our contract with the Tertiary Education Commission.

There are some strong reasons to do this right: Encourage our students to consider careers in science, see themselves in these types of jobs and see how they would improve them. Ultimately, they will set the research agenda, improving our research so that it can offer real benefit to Māori. Supporting our careers of Māori researchers.

One of the key themes of the day highlighted by the tauira was to recognize the essential role of mokopuna. Moko, and the traditional marking, also the person; and pine, spring, pond, as well as puna berries, which means flow.

The remarkable connection between the grandparents and highlights in the features of the granddaughter. For me this also refers to an incredible mother of beef and grandparents. So, you see how the essential connection between mokopuna, grandchildren and grandparents and grandparents has been incorporated into the word itself. Our discussions have been encouraged on the vital role of stakeholders that influence the health and well-being of their grandparents.

It may seem strange, given that we are a Center of Research Excellence of the "aging brain", so that we can think about the intergenerational relationship. It makes me perfect sense. For one thing, does the brain start aging from the moment of concept properly?

And if we empower young people with information, we are already working in prevention. This vane language is invaluable in challenging conventional thinking about what could be meant by the "older age" concept. And for neuroscience organizations these discussions, with wings, with Kura, with tauira, in this way, are new.

Lessons in leadership, coming from these grandchildren, this mokopuna. In addition, you need to test their performance! Leadership, next level.


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