Monday , April 12 2021

Karuizawa – the town of a Japanese destination where people and men want to live happily ever after



21st November 18 | Way of Life

An innovative eco project manages the population of the Asian black bear in a popular hot spring destination in the Japanese Alps. Sarah Marshall visits.

In most places, bees make their presence known with a grunt or bean; In the forests around the Japanese town of Karuizawa, however, the only audio evidence of its existence is a series of bits.

Holding a telemetry device under the crumbling Akaishi Mountains, Tamatani Hiroo, a wildlife researcher, traces one of 30 Asian blackbirds that have been rolled out are monitored in this area. "That's Ikaru," he says, highlighting forest deficiencies, so intense, they are rolled like sparkling waves. "She has been moving around that area over recent years."

The Japanese Southern Alps (Sarah Marshall / PA)
The Japanese Southern Alps (Sarah Marshall / PA)

Tamatani estimates that the 23-year-old woman is only 100 meters away, but we do not even catch an insight into her fur. Although black enemies move regularly through these woodlands, which run continuously for more than 200km from the nearby Niigata Society, they are rarely seen – and the Picchio Wildlife Research Center like to keep it like that.

Tamatani researcher Hiroo records data from the Asian black bear (Sarah Marshall / PA)
Tamatani researcher Hiroo records data from the Asian black bear (Sarah Marshall / PA)

A 60 minute bullet train from Tokyo, Karuizawa is a rich retreat town in the Japanese Alps; A cross between Wimbledon and the Hamptons, its pine and larvae forests extends Western-style philai and boulevards with shoots and boutiques. The Emperor and Empress played a tennis game at the town's public court, and John Lennon spent time with Yoko Ono in the 1970's.

Shopping street in Karuizawa (David Lovejoy / PA)
Shopping street in Karuizawa (David Lovejoy / PA)

There is an old post office on the Nakasendo Highway, which connects Edo (Tokyo today) with Kyoto from the 17th to the mid-19th century, its lack of arable land (which is required to pay rice tax to orders military Shogun) sees him disappear in favor. But in the 1800's, missionaries moved in, taken by the cold mountain sky and pledged sunny days in winter, giving a cosmopolitan character to the town.

The Ornithologists were also denounced by the 80 species of birds found here, and in 1974, the Karuizawa Wildlife Character became the first protected area of ​​Japan type.

Waterfalls are one of the natural attractions in Karuizawa (David Lovejoy / PA)
Waterfalls are one of the natural attractions in Karuizawa (David Lovejoy / PA)

For many years, people were able to live in harmony with their environment. Yet, increasing human spread has had an inevitable impact, and in good condition for natural resources, wildlife has worsened.

"Until the 1990s, we never had a bear problem," explained Picchio's marketing director, Masaya Kusube, whose own home is sitting in the front of the leaf room. But when a gatehouse dropped rummage animals through their rubbish bin – guests were already enjoyable in the process – the animals became at the best of a nuisance, in the threat was a threat. In 2000, more than 200 public bins were damaged by enemies and some communities being appraised by forming vigilant groups.

Picchio Wildlife Research Center (Sarah Marshall / PA)
Picchio Wildlife Research Center (Sarah Marshall / PA)

Found in 1992 as costumes offering eco trips, Picchio has, in recent years, turned its focus on managing human wildlife conflicts in Karuizawa – a pioneering conservation project in Japan.

Masaya is proud to show me one of 40 new public dust gaps that have helped them, along with a number of metal drums "tapes" used to safely capture the enemy and take away from areas that live in them.

We end up in a corner where Karelian Bear Dogs Elf and Rayla are trained to catch a "tree". Feeling the swollen teeth of the puppies that are suddenly covered too lightly around my wrist, I am even hugged to back my own back.

Karelian bear dog was trained to
Bear Karelian Dogs have trained to catch a "tree" (Sarah Marshall / PA)

These competitions, together with the termination of Tamatani telemetry, are all part of a new journey Picchio is planning for tourists, giving an insight into their work and encouraging more Japanese people to fall in love with wildlife.

Ironically, Japan has a long-standing relationship with nature; There is a national religion focus, Shinto, with many images having animal symbols. But while a hedgehog, a cat and even the jungle ask for a cafe to come to an end in Tokyo, the idea of ​​valuing wild animals is still a constant concept.

"Perhaps because wild animals are natural, we do not think they are so valuable," said Masaya when I quiz on the subject. Crucially, it's believed that the West Enders are the key to changing attitudes, whose activities have set trends since Edo's time.

Flying squirrel (Picchio / PA)
Flying squirrel (Picchio / PA)

Later that evening, I'll join another trip organized by Picchio – watching flying squirrels, known as musasabi, make the banks of the sun transporting their nests .

We wait patiently under a nesting box for the scattered creatures and, as if they were in a cuzzle, they ended 30 minutes after the night, flying down slopes steep, wooded as huge autumn leaves borne by the wind.

Flying Squirrel Watch (Picchio / PA)
Flying Squirrel Watch (Picchio / PA)

The touch is quite literally fleet, although there is too much sika fat on a night lunch trip ready to keep around.

Climbing into fashionable 4x4s, we drive to the top of the Prince of Snow Snow Prince, have to fill with drop-down restaurant signs and a fake snowflake. What's more notable than the remains may look at the city; only a fraction of area dancers with lights, showing how wild and untreated Karuizawa continues.

The Hoshinoya Karuizawa Resort (Hoshinoya / PA)
The Hoshinoya Karuizawa Resort (Hoshinoya / PA)

Living alongside nature is a key theme at the Hoshinoya Karuizawa Center, a research center near nearby Picchio Llyn Llyn, which was opened in 1914 at the base of volcanic Mount Asama on a hot spring site. Turning around streams and connecting with bridges, philanthropes present a modern interpretation of traditional Japanese hospitality, with comfortably rising beds of the floor and a bath with a ginger shared fresh and fresh apples full when touching a button.

Freshwater and gold, colors and autumn sweep through the site, and reflections in meals created by the active chef Eiji Inake are reflected in the Kasuke restaurant. Melting to a tasty, rocky mushroom and salmon-pink menu is part of an eight-dimensional stomach fluid, and a necklace has grilled on a pine bark to give him a wooded aroma.

The Kasuke restaurant (Hoshinoya / PA)
The Kasuke restaurant (Hoshinoya / PA)

But the onsite star is a star – or hot spring – Tombo-no-yu. The founder of the Kuniji Hoshino hotel took gambling on spectacular gold during proposed excavations for therapeutic waters, but in an area that was boasted with volcanic activity, its chances were high.

Taking an arsen is a Japanese ritual; turning off naked, visitors wash and relax in baths separately. Sitting in the rotenburo (outdoor bath), I watch crested and crested cedar leaves settling on the steamed granite rocks, creating a patchwork of precious remains. It's a popular public wash site, but Hoshinoya guests have unique access early in the morning.

The hot springs of Tombo-no-yu (Hoshinoya / PA)
The hot springs of Tombo-no-yu (Hoshinoya / PA)

For those who are struggling with community nail, there is a second onsen on the site, opens through the night, with a series of 40C chambers having a light and light and double designed for meditation. When I am visiting 1am, only a few souls float like appearances, disappear in their own mysterious worlds.

Even in the concrete disorder of Tokyo, an onsen is a place for peace and reflection – prove that there is an opportunity to connect to nature, even when there are some green spaces and far away.

Only the actual natural spring of the capital sitting on the 17th floor Hoshinoya sister in the Otemachi financial area, and only guests of the hotel that can enter it. After inspiring by traditional ryokan, tatami mat lorries have rooms and my series has painted in ultramarine punching – one of the key shades used in ancient Japanese art.

Rocks of hot spring construction, used to decorate Hamada restaurant (Hoshinoya / PA)
Rocks of hot spring construction, used to decorate Hamada restaurant (Hoshinoya / PA)

The owners increased 1,500 meters to find a hot spring source, and the rocks raised from the construction work now decorate suburban restaurant, Hamada, where Noriyuki Hamada's active chef uses "Nippon" ingredients with French cooking techniques, and fossilized woods of the Feudal Mansion that has stood here, have been used to produce plates and bowls.

The 17th floor hot spring in Hoshinoya Tokyo (Hoshinoya / PA)
The 17th floor hot spring in Hoshinoya Tokyo (Hoshinoya / PA)

At 5am, I'll lie back in the onsen, looking at a blue piece of ink before morning through the open space. At that moment, with no reference points, we can be anywhere; the city, the forest or the mountain, we share the same sky. And as a lot of heavy wet swelling, roaming around me, nature makes its presence clear.

How to get there

Inside Japan (insidejapantours.com; 0117 370 9751) offers a small 14-night Japanese Enchantment group trip, which includes staying at Karuizawa and some flying squirrel watching. The trip comes from Tokyo through the Japanese Alps to Kanazawa, Kyoto and the Hakone national park, and costs of £ 5,975pp. Additional tickets.

British Airways (ba.com) flies to Tokyo from London of a return of £ 822.

Rooms at Hoshinoya Karuizawa cost £ 434 with breakfast; Rooms at Hoshinoya Tokyo cost £ 496 with breakfast. Visit hoshinoresorts.com.

© Press Society 2018


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