Wednesday , June 29 2022

The feature has internal pockets; inside of each of us let us say what object is by touch only



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Scientists say that the human brain's ability to say what an object is by touch only means that there is a feature of internal pockets; inside of each of us

  • University of Cambridge and Columbia University researchers have assessed data
  • People can recognize objects that they have never seen before by touching them
  • They do this by interpreting small hollow sequences on their fingers

Researchers have identified how the human brain can determine the properties of a particular object from touching only, an internal pocket box feature like it's called.

This feature, like it's called, is intrinsic to all of us, they're saying, and here's the reason a thief can cause a handbag and pull & # 39 the most valuable item immediately.

It depends on the ability of the brain to break up a continuous stream of information and to turn our smaller pieces.

This manifests itself for professional pick up pockets like bales to interpret small hollow sequences on their fingers apart objects have been well defined.

Notably, the participants in our study were not selected as professional pockets – so these results also suggest that we all have a huge, static, pocket-sized pocket; Professor Máté Lengyel of Cambridge University, who co-led the research, said.

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Revealed: The brain can identify objects immediately without the need for clear boundaries or other specialist cues, and predict unknown properties of new objects (stock)

Revealed: The brain can identify objects immediately without the need for clear boundaries or other specialist cues, and predict unknown properties of new objects (stock)

The researchers, from Cambridge University, the University of Central Europe, and Columbia University, found that a similar phenomenon allowed people to predict how an object in a shop window will look at it.

This includes visual input and not a physical sign like the shopper's visual system but it works in a similar way.

Our ability to extract certain objects from cluttered scenes through touch or sight only and accurately predict how they will feel based on how they look, or how they look at how they are Feelings are essential to the way we interact with the world.

The brain performs statistical analyzes of previous experiences to identify objects immediately without the need for clear boundaries or other expert cues.

Then we turn these predictions into the property of the new object.

We look at how the brain takes the continuous flow of information that it receives and shares our objects; said Professor Lengyel.

The common view is that the brain receives specialist cues: such as edges or exclusions, about where one thing ends and something else starts, but we have found that the brain is a very astute statistical machine: t Looking for patterns and building block finds to build objects. # 39;

Professor Lengyel and his colleagues designed scenes from a number of abstract shapes without obvious boundaries between them, and the participants were asked to either observe the shapes on a screen or remove them; apart along a tear line that went either through or between the objects.

The appearance: Our ability to draw certain objects from cluttered scenes through touch or sight on your own and accurately predict how they will feel based on how they look, or how they are & are; It looks based on how they feel, is vital to the way we interact with the world  t

The appearance: Our ability to draw certain objects from cluttered scenes through touch or sight on your own and accurately predict how they will feel based on how they look, or how they are & are; It looks based on how they feel, is vital to the way we interact with the world t

HOW ARE SKIN SENSES

Our touching experiences are already processed by neurons in the skin before they reach the brain for further processing.

Researchers found that the skin actually calculates geometric data itself before sending signals to the brain.

Previously, it was thought that much more basic information had been sent.

Participants were then tested on their ability to predict the visual (how familiar real jigsaw pieces appeared compared to abstract pieces built from parts of two different pieces) and the haptic properties of the t these jigsaw pieces (how difficult it would be to separate apart new. scenes in different directions).

The researchers found that participants were able to form the correct mental image of the jigsaw pieces from one of the inputs only.

These results challenge classic viewpoints on how we draw and learn about objects in our environment; said Professor Lengyel.

Instead, we have shown that universal bespoke statistical computations that are known to operate even in the youngest babies are powerful enough to perform cognitive accomplishments of such kind. # 39;

The results are reported in the open access journal, eLife.

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