Friday , May 7 2021

Stan Lee fought the real world's racism by creating first-class black superheroes – National



Stan Lee was an integral part of Miya Crummell's childhood. As a young girl, a black-haired girl and a self-professional pop culture geek, Lee saw that before her time.

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"At the time, Black Panther wrote when segregation was still heavily," said Lee New York, 27, who Lee thinks to be influencing to become a graphic designer and comic artist. "It was a kind of unknown to have a black lead character, not to mention the character of a title and not just something secondary."

Lee, the master and creator died behind Marvel's biggest superheroes, aged 95 on Monday. As fans celebrate his contributions to the pop culture cannon, some have also looked at how Marvel's wizard felt that the great comic books became a big responsibility. When black people endangered their lives in the 1960's to protest discrimination where they lived and worked, Lee decided to integrate with the first mainstream superhero black. Black Panther, along with the X-Men and Luke Cage, are today's heroes on screen. But back then, they were the soldiers in the Lee battle against global objects of racism and xenophobia.

Under Lee's leadership, Marvel Comics presented a generation of comic book readers to the British leader who regulated advanced legendary and technological kingdom, the pre-black whose brown skin recycles bullets and X-Men, a group of heroes whose superpoweries are as opposed to cultural backgrounds.

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Lee's work and ideas and the artists behind Challa's, the Black Panther; Luke Cage, Hero for Hire; and a band of mutants merry – innovative during the 1960s and 1970s – has become a cultural force that breaks barriers to inclusion.

Lee got his fingers in each that produced Marvel, but some of the characters and plot lines "of the artists were inspired by what was happening in the & # 39; 60s, "said freelance author Alex Simmons.

Still, some white comics distributors were pushback when it came to heroes and black characters. Some Marvel Comics bundles were sent back as some distributors were not ready for the Black Panther and the Wakanda kingdom developed by the artist and co-creator Jack Kirby.

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"Stan had to take those risks," said Simmons. "There was a relief organization, and I believe that Marvel became the voice of the people, attached to that rebellious energy and marking with her."

Lee also spoke readers directly about the irrelevance of hate. In 1968, a horrible year that saw the murder of Martin Luther King Jr., Lee wrote one of the most vocal "Stan" s Soapbox columns calling for greatness and racism "the most deadly social plagues world today. "

"But, unlike a team of super dressed villains, they can not be stopped with why in the snoot, or a zap of a gun gun," says Lee.

Marvel's characters were at the forefront of how to deal with forms of racial discrimination and other forms of discrimination, according to Mikhail Lyubansky, who is learning racist psychology and ethnicity at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. With the X-Men, many readers saw the mutants, being affected by their powers, as a commentary on how Americans were treated and that anyone was seen as "the other."

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"The original X-Men was less about race and more about cultural differences," said Lyubansky. "Black Panther and some of the films (Marvel) took the mantle and ran with the racist issue in ways that I thought Stan did not intend, but they were a great deal to her."

Some of the attempts to cut minority characters are not very good. Marvel Characters such as the Fu Manchu-esque The Mandarin and American Native American athletic hero Wyatt Wingfoot are considered innovative in the 60s and & # 39; 70s, but they can appear a date and too stereotype looking at a lens of the 21st century.

"Interestingly, Stan Lee is taking the credit and the fault, depending on the character," said William Foster III, who helped establish the East Eastern Comics East Convention and it's English teacher at Naugatuck Valley Community College in Waterbury, Connecticut.

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Foster, who started reading Marvel Comics in the 1960's, said that making something as small as colorful people in the background is memorable.

"Stan Lee had a attitude" We're in New York City. How can we not get black people in New York City? "Foster said.

Blackies began to take part in the roles of heroes and poisons. Foster said some characters could be considered "tokenism" but sometimes that the progress must begin.

Within 10 years, Marvel Sinematic Universe films have given more than $ 17.6 billion in global grosses. He shot the film "Black Panther" in more than $ 200 million in his first weekend earlier this year. Next year, actress Brie Larson will fly as "Captain Marvel." An animated film focusing on Miles Morales, a half-black teenager and half-Puerto Rico who inherits the Spider-Man, will fall next month. And there is still an interest around Kamala Khan a.k.a. Ms. Marvel, the first Muslim superhero.

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"I had a lot of white friends growing up," said Simmons, a freelance author, who was black. "We've seen Batman and we also watched The Squad Squad. My personal belief is, if you put the material out in front of the people and contact him, they will contact her. "

For many supporters and consumers, it is related to the product that is not the color of the skin or the sexual orientation of the character, he added.

Crummell, the comic book artist, said she thought that the representation for minors and women in comic books was improving.

"I'm thinking now, they're seeing everyone read comics. It's not a specific group now," said Crummell. "It's not just African people – there are women, Asians, Spanish characters now. We'll be credited to Stan Lee with a kind of breaking barrier to that."


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