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More About Life Kurt Cobain With the author Author Danny Goldberg



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Server: Remembering Kurt Cobain "by Danny Goldberg is released by Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins, on April 2. (Photo AP / Elaine Thompson)

Danny Goldberg, the life manager of the music industry and former manager of Nirvana, has worked behind the curtains for decades with some of the most prominent acts of rock. Now in his late 60s, he began his career under an apprenticeship Albert GrossmanBob Dylan and Janis Joplin, famous and uncompromising manager, landed his big break as publisher for Led Zeppelin in 1973.

Poaching pole over the swamp and spandex which defined America's mainstream core in the 80s, Goldberg began to control Nirvana ten months before releasing the band's first label, 1991 & nbsp;It does not matterthe world was quickly swept in a rock delirium that had not been seen since "Beatlemania."

April 2nd, and timed around 25 years since Cobain's death on April 5, & nbsp;Server Server: Remembering Kurt Cobain & nbsp;undoubtedly the most personal and personal volume of the artist's experience of fame so far. (Until Courtney Love releases the book she designed herself somewhere down the road.) T

My dispersed discussion with Goldberg about Cobain and Nirvana continues here in Part II as we meander through subjects & nbsp;In Utero, the influence of Courtney's love, Dave Grohl's private ambition and more.

Part I of this interview was published on Monday, 25 March and can be viewed here.

Russ Espinoza: Kurt music appeal, especially with It does not matterIt was so far-reaching that he and Krist would be worried about the part of their fans base that had kicked their assessments; in secondary school. Was the basic protest In Utero & nbsp;Kurt's way is part of telling the world's meat heads not to like his music?

Danny Goldberg: I don't think he wants – I mean, on that lining notes Incesticide he told people who were sexist or homophobic or racist in reserve. So we thought about when he would hear about a rapist playing Polly for his victim, which meant that he was so horrible to him. So I thought they were sending a [message about] behavior that was so offensive to him that he did not want to be associated with him. [But] I have a slightly different opinion It does not matter against In Utero: I don't think they sound different; I think they sound like the same band; there is definitely the same singer; it is the same artist; it 's evolution. I think that the level of depth to the words is special with In Utero that was the best words he wrote. And I think he has a sense of body of work in relation to an audience, [and] artistic balance that it always adapts, from one to the other, not to repeat itself and to grow and to have art that was authentic and not just a kind of commercial sequence. But there are many dark words on Bleach and on It does not matter also. It does not matter has'Territorial Pissings# 39; and so on. I just thought In Utero what grew to be a songwriter: and I think some of the words reflect self-awareness of now that it's not unknown – something like felServing the Servants'- And I think that involvement with Courtney sang songs likePennyroyal Tea, 'And I think some of the things that happened to him had affected him as a composer between the records. But I don't see them as two different artists, I saw them as two different albums by the same artist.

Espinoza: Did you share Kurt's view that the mainstream of the 70s and the 80s; intrinsically sexual and homophobic? Did you at least understand that perspective if it wasn't?

Goldberg: Oh completely! Completely. First of all, I agreed with him about that. Secondly, I think that he was torn: I thought he liked the music. He liked Led Zeppelin music – and AC / DC. But the words were not something he felt comfortable with, for the very reason you said. And I thought I was saying something like that in the book, and I wanted to do it because it was central to who it was our artist. Certainly, it was culturally related to the values ​​of the rock punk communities, which rebelled not only against Reagan and things about society that pissed people away, but they rebelled about the things the business was doing. music in their production. And that was a generation statement and it was one that he was part of. But as a musician, he got a very broad appreciation: As is widely known, he loved the Beatles – the Beatles did not have some sexist words, made. You know, I love John Lennon and Kurt loves John Lennon, but I believe thatNorwegian trees'Although quite a bit on the sexist side. But he loved the music of many different artists, but culturally he recognized a moral code; and that was one of the things for me and it made me an artist so excited to know and work with him; and that included real folly of stereotypes and macho behavior.

Espinoza: You were quoted by Rolling Stone at Kurt's funeral saying, “I think he would have left the world years ago if he hadn't met Courtney.” You saw that their relationship was closer to almost to three years: How important, positive did Courtney fill the life of Kurt?

Goldberg: I don't know how to cut them apart. You know, to count the different – I mean, I'm in love with someone now, I wouldn't know how to answer that about my own personal life. I just thought they were in love with each other. They were two very complex people: Both with a lot of damage from their childhood, with drug problems; incredibly talented people – and honoring that. I don't claim to be ever there. I didn't live with them or anything like that – I was manager. So I have to go through what I saw: I suppose any couple they had got suddenly, but there is no question in my opinion. be in love with each other. That's all I can say, you know? Why would Kurt have been with her if she wasn't in love with her? It is not so that he had no control over his life – he could not control all his internal demons – but he certainly managed everything externally.

Espinoza: Changing focus to Dave Grohl for a second: You'd probably bring a guitar with him on Nirvana tours and write songs in secret from his hotel rooms – without wanting to bounce from band to band t as a drummer for the rest of his life. How aware were you of your songwriting talent, and why did he not end up singing with the Atlantic while you were there?

Goldberg: I had left the Atlantic, by the Foo Fighters being around, I thought I was in Mercury. I don't really remember where I was. But my memory, I don't think I'm still in the Atlantic. I don't really remember. I don't think they worked with me at the top of their list, [Nirvana co-manager John] Silva and Dave. The sort of deal I remember looking for – and they did exactly what was right; Silva is a great manager, he has done a great job, great – he was more of a distribution deal, I believe, than a full record deal. That's my memory of him. I have never met or discussed it. Certainly, I had no idea that they were going to be that big. But as I said, I didn't have such a relationship with Dave, did you know? I was drawn by different forces in my life at different times, and once Kurt and Courtney were with each other, which was within a month of It does not matter were released, there was a certain partition, and my role was clear and my kindly preceded with Kurt and Courtney. Over the years I have stayed in close contact with Krist because this other thing was always common to us, which is our common interest in American politics, civil liberties and so on. But in fact, the first time I spoke to Krist about Kurt, since Kurt died, was when I wrote this book. In all the twenty years that followed we talked about politics, which is what we talked about. It was not a music business conversation or music that I had with Krist. And I didn't have such a relationship with Dave, so you had to ask them. I know it was never a serious discussion. I'm sure John said,, Hey, Dave wants to meet you, I definitely would have met them, but I don't remember having ever received that call.

Espinoza: What was the side of Kurt's lighter?

Goldberg: He had great humor. I spoke to about 40 people for the book – I didn't speak to every person I knew during that time, there were some people who didn't want to talk, but I'd be say 80 per cent of the people have done— I don't think anyone who didn't mention his humor. He was prone to depression, there is no question about him, but he was not depressed by the time, and he had a side that was very funny and charming and sweet. It was only part of the things that made me love him as much as a person, as well as my admiration for his talent. You know, I always arrange a freeze when people ask me to remember a story; kind of any stories that I can actually remember, I put them in the book, and I'm not quite sure beyond what to say. But he was a very complicated man: and part of his complexity was that he, you know, enjoyed having a good meal, he loved playing with our daughter, he had a great sense of humor and interest in other people and what was going on with them. He was not a narcissist in that regard, you know?

Espinoza: With all of Kurt's risk factors for suicide, do you think he knew deeply that it was just a matter of time before he overstated or committed suicide?

Goldberg: I do not know. You know, you're going to a field of psychology that wasn't accessible to me. I do not know. That 's locked in a secret box that I don't have access to.

Espinoza: From a management perspective only, what was the most penetrating chapter of Nirvana's business?

Goldberg: The most difficult thing was dealing with the response to Lynn Hirschberg's article in Vanity Fair – and those rebates. As Kurt was the focus of Nirvana's business and was so destabilizing his situation. That was definitely the most challenging thing.

Espinoza: What is the state of roller rock in 2019?

Goldberg: In general, I think rock rock is a cultural niche and not mainstream pop. From the end ‘60s through It does not matterrock was the biggest commercial music. You know, rock and pop overlap enormously. Now, the biggest pop artists tend to be hip-hop or dance, or other types of music, and rock is more of a specialist genre such as jazz or jazz or blues that produces a commercial artist t great like Arcade Fire or a few others. But hip-hop has replaced a significant part of the cultural role in relation to teenagers that the rock has played in previous decades.

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"Serving the server: Cofio Kurt Cobain" by Danny Goldberg will be released by Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins, on April 2. (Photo AP / Elaine Thompson)

Danny Goldberg, the life manager of the music industry and former manager of Nirvana, has worked behind the curtains for decades with some of the most prominent acts of rock. Now in the late 60's, his career apprenticeship began with Albert Grossman, the famous and uncompromising manager of Dylan Dylan and Janis Joplin, before landing his great break as publisher for Led Zeppelin in 1973.

Pole poaching over the swamp and spandex which defined America's mainstream core in the 80s, Goldberg began to manage Nirvana ten months before the band's first label, 1991 It does not matterthe world was quickly swept in a rock delirium that had not been seen since "Beatlemania."

April 2nd, and timed around 25 years since Cobain's death on April 5, Server Server: Remembering Kurt Cobain undoubtedly the most personal and personal volume of the artist's experience of fame so far. (Until Courtney Love releases the book she designed herself somewhere down the road.) T

My disturbing discussion with Goldberg about Cobain and Nirvana continues here in Part II as we interpret through In Utero, the influence of Courtney's love, Dave Grohl's private ambition and more.

Part I of this interview was published on Monday, 25 March and can be viewed here.

Russ Espinoza: Kurt music appeal, especially with It does not matterIt was so far-reaching that he and Krist would be worried about the part of their fans base that had kicked their assessments; in secondary school. Was the basic protest In Utero Kurt's way is part of telling the world's meat heads not to like his music?

Danny Goldberg: I don't think he wants – I mean, on the lining notes of Incesticide he told people who were sexist or homophobic or racist in reserve. So we thought about when he would hear about a rapist playing Polly for his victim, which meant that he was so horrible to him. So I thought they were sending a [message about] behavior that was so offensive to him that he did not want to be associated with him. [But] I have a slightly different opinion It does not matter against In Utero: I don't think they sound different; I think they sound like the same band; there is definitely the same singer; it is the same artist; it 's evolution. I think that the level of depth to the words is special with In Utero that was the best words he wrote. And I think he has a sense of body of work in relation to an audience, [and] artistic balance that it always adapts, from one to the other, not to repeat itself and to grow and to have art that was authentic and not just a kind of commercial sequence. But there are many dark words on Bleach and on It does not matter also. It does not matter Ol Territorial Terms ’and so on. I just thought In Utero what grew to be a songwriter: and I think that some of the words reflect self-awareness of now that it's not unknown – something like Servants & Servers; – and I think that taking part with Courtney has sang songs like & # 39; Hot Pennyroyal, and I believe that some of the things that happened to him had affected him as a composer between the records. But I don't see them as two different artists, I saw them as two different albums by the same artist.

Espinoza: Did you share Kurt's view that the mainstream of the 70s and the 80s; intrinsically sexual and homophobic? Did you at least understand that perspective if it wasn't?

Goldberg: Oh completely! Completely. First of all, I agreed with him about that. Secondly, I think that he was torn: I thought he liked the music. He liked Led Zeppelin music – and AC / DC. But the words were not something he felt comfortable with, for the very reason you said. And I thought I was saying something like that in the book, and I wanted to do it because it was central to who it was our artist. Certainly, it was culturally related to the values ​​of the rock punk communities, which rebelled not only against Reagan and things about society that pissed people away, but they rebelled about the things the business was doing. music in their production. And that was a generation statement and it was one that he was part of. But as a musician, he got a very broad appreciation: As is widely known, he loved the Beatles – the Beatles did not have some sexist words, made. You know, I love John Lennon and Kurt delighted with John Lennon, but I think that Norwegian Wood is a bit on the sexist side. But he loved the music of many different artists, but culturally he recognized a moral code; and that was one of the things for me and it made me an artist so excited to know and work with him; and that included real folly of stereotypes and macho behavior.

Espinoza: You were quoted by Rolling Stone at Kurt's funeral saying, “I think he would have left the world years ago if he hadn't met Courtney.” You saw that their relationship was closer to almost to three years: How important, positive did Courtney fill the life of Kurt?

Goldberg: I don't know how to cut them apart. You know, to count the different – I mean, I'm in love with someone now, I wouldn't know how to answer that about my own personal life. I just thought they were in love with each other. They were two very complex people: Both with a lot of damage from their childhood, with drug problems; incredibly talented people – and honoring that. I don't claim to be ever there. I didn't live with them or anything like that – I was manager. So I have to go through what I saw: I suppose any couple they had got suddenly, but there is no question in my opinion. be in love with each other. That's all I can say, you know? Why would Kurt have been with her if she wasn't in love with her? It is not so that he had no control over his life – he could not control all his internal demons – but he certainly managed everything externally.

Espinoza: Changing focus to Dave Grohl for a second: You'd probably bring a guitar with him on Nirvana tours and write songs in secret from his hotel rooms – without wanting to bounce from band to band t as a drummer for the rest of his life. How aware were you of your songwriting talent, and why did he not end up singing with the Atlantic while you were there?

Goldberg: I had left the Atlantic, by the Foo Fighters being around, I thought I was in Mercury. I don't really remember where I was. But my memory, I don't think I'm still in the Atlantic. I don't really remember. I don't think they worked with me at the top of their list, [Nirvana co-manager John] Silva and Dave. The sort of deal I remember looking for – and they did exactly what was right; Silva is a great manager, he has done a great job, great – he was more of a distribution deal, I believe, than a full record deal. That's my memory of him. I have never met or discussed it. Certainly, I had no idea that they were going to be that big. But as I said, I didn't have such a relationship with Dave, did you know? I was drawn by different forces in my life at different times, and once Kurt and Courtney were with each other, which was within a month of It does not matter were released, there was a certain partition, and my role was clear and my kindly preceded with Kurt and Courtney. Over the years I have stayed in close contact with Krist because this other thing was always common to us, which is our common interest in American politics, civil liberties and so on. But in fact, the first time I spoke to Krist about Kurt, since Kurt died, was when I wrote this book. In all the twenty years that followed we talked about politics, which is what we talked about. It was not a music business conversation or music that I had with Krist. And I didn't have such a relationship with Dave, so you had to ask them. I know it was never a serious discussion. I'm sure John said,, Hey, Dave wants to meet you, I definitely would have met them, but I don't remember having ever received that call.

Espinoza: What was the side of Kurt's lighter?

Goldberg: He had great humor. I spoke to about 40 people for the book – I didn't speak to every person I knew during that time, there were some people who didn't want to talk, but I'd be say 80 per cent of the people have done— I don't think anyone who didn't mention his humor. He was prone to depression, there is no question about him, but he was not depressed by the time, and he had a side that was very funny and charming and sweet. It was only part of the things that made me love him as much as a person, as well as my admiration for his talent. You know, I always arrange a freeze when people ask me to remember a story; kind of any stories that I can actually remember, I put them in the book, and I'm not quite sure beyond what to say. But he was a very complicated man: and part of his complexity was that he, you know, enjoyed having a good meal, he loved playing with our daughter, he had a great sense of humor and interest in other people and what was going on with them. He was not a narcissist in that regard, you know?

Espinoza: With all of Kurt's risk factors for suicide, do you think he knew deeply that it was just a matter of time before he overstated or committed suicide?

Goldberg: I do not know. You know, you're going to a field of psychology that wasn't accessible to me. I do not know. That 's locked in a secret box that I don't have access to.

Espinoza: From a management perspective only, what was the most penetrating chapter of Nirvana's business?

Goldberg: The most difficult thing was dealing with the response to Lynn Hirschberg's article in Vanity Fair – and those rebates. As Kurt was the focus of Nirvana's business and was so destabilizing his situation. That was definitely the most challenging thing.

Espinoza: What is the state of roller rock in 2019?

Goldberg: In general, I think rock rock is a cultural niche and not mainstream pop. From the end ‘60s through It does not matterrock was the biggest commercial music. You know, rock and pop overlap enormously. Now, the biggest pop artists tend to be hip-hop or dance, or other types of music, and rock is more of a specialist genre such as jazz or jazz or blues that produces a commercial artist t great like Arcade Fire or a few others. But hip-hop has replaced a significant part of the cultural role in relation to teenagers that the rock has played in previous decades.

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