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Video: SpaceFlight Space Insider Bulletin for May 18, 2019



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She's another lunar week with NASA's challenge “Moon by 2024” gets a name, the agency's 2020 budget bid gets better and more.

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Earthrise as seen by the crew of Apollo 10 as it turns the Moon. Photo credit: NASA

Earthrise as seen by the crew of Apollo 10 as it turns the Moon. Photo credit: NASA

She's another lunar week with NASA's challenge “Moon by 2024” gets a name, the agency's 2020 budget bid gets better and more.

The topics included in the May 18 2019 edition of the Space Bulletin are the newly named Artemis program and its financial year 2020 financial bid, as well as the initial responses from members of & t The congress. In addition, NASA is already beginning to distribute initial study contracts to begin the development of human graduated moon cleaners.

Meanwhile, an analysis of old Apollo data seismometers and images of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter shows that shrinkage of the Moon can cause moon rocks.

To conclude this week's Space Bulletin, Michael Howard and Space Siegel, SpaceFlight Insider, are putting behind the curtains of our ongoing broadcast of Starlink SpaceX's mission.

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Video courtesy of SpaceFlight Insider

Tagged: NASA Artemis Moon Program NextSTEP-2 Starlink Space Bulletin The Range

Derek Richardson

Derek Richardson has a degree in mass media, with an emphasis in contemporary journalism, from Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas. While at Washburn, he was the managing editor of the student newspaper, the Washburn Review. He also has a blog about the International Space Station, known as Orbital Velocity. He met members of the SpaceFlight Insider team during a United League Launch V 551 rocket tour with a MUOS-4 satellite. Richardson joined our team soon after.

He made his passion for space guns when he watched the Space Shuttle Discovery launch in the space of October 29, 1998. Today, this trigger has accelerated towards orbit and shows no signs of slowing down. After tapping in maths and engineering courses at college, he soon realized his real call was to communicate with others about a place. Since joining SpaceFlight Insider in 2015, Richardson has worked to increase the quality of our content, eventually becoming a managing editor. @TheSpaceWriter


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