Wednesday , May 25 2022

The Pipeline supporter rally as the Minister of Finance of Morneau comes to Calgary



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Around 1,000 energy and pipeline supporters collect outside the Telus Convention Center on Monday, November 27, 2018, where Finance Minister Bill Morneau spoke to the Calgary Chamber of Commerce.

Gavin Young / Postmedia

As the Gray Cup rehearsals go ahead in the city hall of Calgary, a different type rally takes a few blocks away as pipeline fans fall on the Telus Convention Center.

Tuesday's rally is a proven show of power from Trans Mountain pipeline advisers to voice and frustrate with the delegated project to Federal Finance Minister, Bill Morneau.

Morneau was in town to meet the Calgary Chamber of Commerce hot on the sense of First Minister's left trip, Justin Trudeau, to Calgary last year, and also provokes a professional protest.

A team of Postmedia reporters and photographers discuss the event alive:

Thousands of people gathered outside the Hyatt Regency on Thursday during Trudeau time in Calgary, enforcing the police to shut down roads in the city center during one of the largest public exhibitions seen never on Calgary streets.

The rally was organized on Tuesday by the Canadian Action pipeline support group, which held another rally back in May to show their support of the project before Ottawa stepped in to buy the Kinder Morgan pipeline for $ 4.5 billion.

James Robson told Canada Action that the group was developing the success of the rally last week and has no intention to stay silent.

"Every time the cabinet minister or prime minister comes to the town, we need to go out and hear our voices," said Robson.

"We had pipeline permission, we had killer lines that had been killed. Now we have a national ownership line and we do not see much progress, so there is a lot of frustration in the energy sector."

Around a thousand Calgarians protested the lack of pipelines outside the Telus Convention Center on Monday November 27, 2018. Finance Minister, Bill Morneau, spoke to the Calgary Chamber of Commerce at lunch inside the center. Gavin Young / Postmedia

Gavin Young / /

Postmedia

Robson said he hoped the show will show the "People behind the newspapers behind the Newspapers and behind the Choice of Western Canada" price.

Many exhibitors kept signs telling Bill C-48 and C-69, with Robson calling C-69 into one of the pieces of legislation that could be destructive to the oil sector and gas.

The federal government had stepped in after months of political uncertainty, conflicts between allies and the NDP Alberta and B.C. protests. which led to the arrest of MP Elizabeth May, leader of the Green Party of Canada.

The project is now in limbo after a court verdict has succeeded in the federal approval of the Trans Mountain expansion.

Ken Buckley works for an oil and gas gas audit company and said he had attended the protests to show opposition to the way the federal government is "squeezing our industry."

"(We're) trying to send a message that says," hey, we're unhappy, & # 39; he says. "We do not have any love, we do not get any support … we are frustrated."

Around a thousand Calgarians protested the lack of pipelines outside the Telus Convention Center on Monday November 27, 2018. Finance Minister, Bill Morneau, spoke to the Calgary Chamber of Commerce at lunch inside the center. Gavin Young / Postmedia

Gavin Young / /

Postmedia

Under the Trans Mountain agreement, Alberta government will give $ 2 billion to help cover costs in return for pipeline ownership.

In addition to the price of $ 4.5 billion to buy the current line, the pipeline will also require a $ 7.4 billion expansion to move Alberta oil to B.C. coast to send to international markets.

Brian Wimmer does not work in oil and gas but said he felt encouraged to attend the rally as a "sign of despair" and show the federal government that "something has to happen "to start the Trans Mountain project.

"At least the government could give us some up-to-date information about what's happening," he said.

Mayor of Calgary, Naheed Nenshi, said Tuesday that the tireless advocacy of the provincial and federal government "for market access" in recent months "has been greatly appreciated," but he added that he needed to be a "more coherent overall strategy" for economic growth in the city.

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On Twitter: @RCRumbolt

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