Wednesday , November 25 2020

Samsung and Stanford are developing OLED technology with 10,000 PPI



o Link Andreas
Samsung and Stanford University have developed OLED technology that offers a pixel density of 10,000 PPI and is said to even be expandable. The technology is said to be profitable and Samsung is working on a “full size” display.

One of the biggest obstacles to the success of VR devices is the displays and their pixel density. Depending on the model and type, this is evident with a more strongly developed flying screen effect. Remedy is now to come from Samsung and Stanford University, where they have researched OLED technology that reaches 10,000 PPI (pixels per inch). There is already talk of flawless VR, but it will probably take a few years before it can be used in practice – if it ever comes.

The new technology happened by designing ultra-thin solar panels and realizing that light can flow around objects at the nano level. The result is three layers of film that manipulate white light emitted in such a way that displays can be created with very high pixel density. The four sub-pixels applied by lithography on the meta-surface are in the nano range, which allows the high pixel density. The light produced by the pixels is based on the density of the nano columns, which then treats the white light in red, green and blue. The light between the foil is reflected until it reaches the surface through the silver layer. By reflecting the light, the brightness should be twice that of an OLED display with conventional filters that absorb up to 70 percent of the light. In addition, the colors should be even better than with conventional technology.





Future of VR: Samsung and Stanford develop OLED technology with 10,000 PPI (2)


Future of VR: Samsung and Stanford develop OLED technology with 10,000 PPI (2)

Source: Mark Brongersma / Science




But another issue is whether all of this can be economically produced in a series. After all, Samsung should already build a display based on this “full size” technology. Whatever one can understand by “full size”. By American standards, it’s probably 75 inches. It also says production in this “full size” is considered “profitable”. And the researchers promise you can even reach 20,000 PPI. Research on Micro LED finds between 10,000 and 30,000 PPIs in practice.

It is clear, however, that printing is here as well. The affordable future of exhibitions with very high pixel density is likely to be in the application of the structures to film. On the other hand, there are micro-LEDs that machines must install on a conveyor and solder. Printing methods and exposure to publications promise significantly higher volumes at the same time and therefore greater economic efficiency – without considering the product first.

Those: ieee.org

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