Monday , August 15 2022

A new dynamic dependency framework can lead to improved social and technology systems models



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<a rel = "lightbox" href = "https://3c1703fe8d.site.internapcdn.net/newman/gfx/news/2019/newdynamicde.jpg" title = "In a recently published paper Nature Physics, The Bar-Ilan University, Prof. Havlin, and a team of researchers, including Stefano Boccaletti, Ivan Bonamassa and Michael M. Danziger, present a dynamic dependency framework that can hold interdependent and competitive interactions between dynamic systems used to study synchronization and spreading processes in multilayer networks with interactive layers. Main results of this image. (Top Left) Phase diagram for two Kuramoto partially competitive models with multidisciplinary regions. (Right Start) Theoretical and numerical results for interdependent SIS epidemics (Erdos-Renyi graphs, average grade = 12). (Lower Bottom) Pathway dependent transformations (wake up) in sympathetic SIS dynamics. (Right Bottom) Critical scoring of luggage (ghosts in goal bifurcations) higher than hybrid transfers in interdependent dynamics Credit: Professor Shlomo Havlin and team ">
A new dynamic dependency framework can lead to improved social and technology systems models

In a paper recently published in Aberystwyth Nature Physics, The Bar-Ilan University, Prof. Havlin, and a team of researchers, including Stefano Boccaletti, Ivan Bonamassa and Michael M. Danziger, present a dynamic dependency framework that can hold interdependent and competitive interactions between dynamic systems used to study synchronization and spreading processes in multilayer networks with interactive layers. Main results of this image. (Top Left) Phase diagram for two Kuramoto partially competitive models with multidisciplinary regions. (Right Start) Theoretical and numerical results for interdependent SIS epidemics (Erdos-Renyi graphs, average grade = 12). (Lower Bottom) Pathway dependent transformations (wake up) in sympathetic SIS dynamics. (Right Bottom) Critical scoring of luggage (ghosts in nod bifurcations) for hybrid transfers in interdependent dynamics Credit: Professor Shlomo Havlin and team

Many complex world-based systems include macroscopic sub-systems that influence each other. This raises, for example, when competing or reinforcing nucleal populations in the brain, spreading the dynamics of viruses, and elsewhere. It is therefore important to understand how different types of inter-system interaction can influence general behaviors.


In 2010, significant progress was made when the interim reliance theory was introduced by Professor Shlomo Havlin and a team of researchers from the Department of Physics at Bar-Ilan University in a study published in Nature. This model showed that when goals in one network depend on goals in another operation, there are catastrophic cascades of sudden structural failures and transfers, as seen in the electrical sheet that affected many of Italy in 2003 .

However, interdependent restrictions are limited to systems where practicality is specifically determined by connectivity, providing only a partial understanding to the wealth of real world systems whose function is defined by dynamic rules .

Research has shown that there are two basic ways that goals in one system can influence goals in another interdependence (or co-operation), such as in critical infrastructure or financial networks, and inequality (or competition), as seen in ecological systems , social networks, or in the human brain. Interdependent and competitive interactions could occur at the same time, as seen in relation to predators in ecological systems, and in binocular cycling competition.

In a paper recently published in Aberystwyth Nature Physics, The Bar-Ilan University, Prof. Havlin, and a team of researchers, including Stefano Boccaletti, Ivan Bonamassa and Michael M. Danziger, present a dynamic dependency framework that can hold interdependent and competitive interactions between dynamic systems used to study synchronization and spreading processes in multilayer networks with interactive layers.

"This dynamic dependency framework provides a powerful tool to better understand the number of interactive complex systems that surround us," said Havlin and a team. "The generalization of dependent interactions from percolation to dynamic systems allows the development of new models for nuclear, social and technological systems that are still better the subtle ways that different systems can affect each other."

Professor Havlin's research since 2000 has produced innovative new mathematical methods in network science that have led to extensive interdisciplinary research in the field. Following Havlin's announcement and colleagues from the theory of compliance, he received the Lilienfeld, American Physical Society Award, awarded for "the most outstanding contribution to physics". Earlier this year he received the Israeli Award in Chemistry and Physics.


Investigate further:
Scientists are reviewing a global network of networks & # 39;

More information:
Michael M. Danziger et al, Interdependence and dynamic competition in multi-paper networks, Nature Physics (2018). DOI: 10.1038 / s41567-018-0343-1

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