Tuesday , December 1 2020

In a controversial shift, Japan is aiming to open the door to foreign blue-collar workers



Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's Cabinet on Friday approved the bill to open the door to overseas blue-collar workers in labor shortages, with immigrant timidity in Japan with controversial political change.

Japan's immigration dispute even warms when US President Donald Trump puts the subject in focus and focuses on mid-term elections for next week's congress.

Immigration has long been taboo so many Japanese awards for ethnic homogeneity, but the reality of the aging, shrinking population poses challenges to these views.

Despite being concerned about the Apse's Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), parliament is likely to accept the reviews of the pressure of the most stringent labor market for decades, though opposition parties may delay it.

The revised Act would create two new categories of visas for foreigners in the labor shortage sector. Although not described, more than a dozen is expected, from farming and construction to hotels and grooming.

Takashi Yamashita, the Justice Minister, quantified the numbers on Thursday, but according to the media, over 500,000 blue-collar workers can be permitted over time, 40 percent more than 1.28 million foreign workers currently accounting for about 2 percent of the workforce.

Workers in the first visa category must have a certain level of skills and Japanese language skills. They can not afford to keep their family members for five years.

But those with higher-grade skills, in the second category, can bring family and eventually stay there.

Japan is increasingly accepting foreign labor, but the focus is on professionals and highly qualified professionals.

In the case of blue-collar workers, employers rely mostly on the "technical trainees" scheme and foreign-based part-time students are excluded by critics.

"Today, it is very difficult for foreigners to get security guards," said Shigeki Yawaya, Security Director Security Director, who has been dealing with non-Japanese over a dozen years. "The Olympic Games are coming up and the government is working on inbound tourism, so we want more overseas."

The LDP legislators signed the bill after the heated parties party. Many have expressed concern about the negative impact of crime and wages. Opposition politicians unduly urge the government to protect the rights of foreign workers.

Abe said that the changes do not represent an "immigration policy" for its obvious desire not to interfere with its conservative advocates. Many experts are different.

"I think this is a real transition to immigration policy," said Hidenori Sakanaka, former head of the Tokyo Immigration Bureau.

The "first Japanese party" was a tiny nationalist protested against the changes, for example because of fears such as foreigners due to the welfare rolls and the slumping of the crime rate.

However, a recent survey by Yomiuri newspaper showed that 51 per cent of Japanese voters liked less skilled foreign workers, and about 43 per cent supported "immigration" – about the same percentage as the counterparts.

"I think it's a good thing as long as there is a support system for foreigners," said retired Yoshio Sai. – I wish they could have more jobs for the elderly.


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